A Day of Genius with One Day University - 92Y, New York

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A Day of Genius with One Day University

Professors Susan Lindee (U PENN), Matthew Stanley (NYU), and David Blight (Yale University)
This program is taking place remotely. If you have signed up, you will receive an email with details of how to access the program.
1:30-2:30 pm: The Genius of Marie Curie with Susan Lindee, The University of Pennsylvania

The brilliant Polish physicist and chemist Marie Curie lived a life of profound personal courage. Her experiences illuminate a culture of "pure science" now long gone, and they help us understand some of the continuing issues for women scientists. She and her future husband Pierre worked ceaselessly under what turned out to be very dangerous and unwise conditions: they isolated radium and polonium, launched the entirely new science of radioactivity, and basically founded a scientific empire. Curie defended her doctoral dissertation in the spring of 1903 and a few months later she and her husband were awarded the Nobel Prize. After her husband died, she continued her demanding scientific work, going on to win another Nobel Prize for chemical work with radium. She served heroically at the French front during World War I, when Curie and her teen-aged daughter Irene drove an X-ray truck she had outfitted herself, to help doctors assess the brutal wounds of the First World War.

When Curie died in 1934 of a form of anemia brought on by exposure to radiation, she was one of the most famous women in the world. Austere, reserved, and powerful, she became a symbol of female genius, the only female scientist commonly included in children’s books and other popular sources. In this lecture, we will explore her astonishing life and work and its implications for women in science today.

Break from 2:30-2:40 pm

2:40-3:40 pm: The Genius of Albert Einstein with Matthew Stanley, NYU

Einstein’s name is synonymous with genius. His wild-haired, thoughtful-eyed face has become an icon of modern science. His ideas changed the way we see the universe, the meaning of truth, and the very limits of human knowledge. This course will examine how Einstein’s youthful philosophical questioning led to a revolution in science. We will discuss his creation of special and general relativity, and particularly how these epochal theories emerged from his seemingly simple questions about how we experience the world. His preference for easily-visualizable thought experiments means we will be able to engage deeply with the science with very little mathematics. Einstein also pioneered quantum mechanics, only to reject its strange consequences and eventually devote his life to overturning it through a unified field theory.

Einstein’s elevation to worldwide fame was closely tied to political and social developments such as World War I, Zionism, and the rise of the Nazis. As he became an incarnation of genius, people sought out his views on everything from world peace to the nature of God—and his opinions often had surprising links to his scientific work. The picture of Einstein we end up with is a figure somehow both revolutionary and deeply traditional, emblematic of the modern age and also profoundly uncomfortable with it.

Break from 3:40-4 pm

4-5 pm: The Genius of Frederick Douglass with David Blight, Yale University

Frederick Douglass was born in 1818 and escaped from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland. He was taught to read by his slave owner mistress, and he would go on to become one of the major literary figures of his time. Douglass spoke often, using his own story to condemn slavery. By the Civil War, he had become the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation. In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. After the war he sometimes argued politically with younger African Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican party or the cause of black civil and political rights.

Yale Professor David Blight’s lecture draws on new information held in a private collection that few other historians have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers, as he did in his Pulitzer Prize winning book, Fredrick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom.

Susan Lindee

Susan Lindee is a Janice and Julian Bers Professor of History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania …

Matthew Stanley

Matthew Stanley teaches the history and philosophy of science at NYU. He holds degrees in astronomy, religion, physics, and the history of science …

David Blight

David Blight is Sterling Professor of American History at Yale University …

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