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Twenty-five years after the arrival of the Internet, we are drowning in data and deadlines; we can never have imagined that our daily intake of information and achieving a healthy balance in our personal and professional lives could feel so complex and so unhealthy.

In 1946, the World Health Organization defined health as “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” However, in the span of seventy years, the rapid development of technology has dramatically changed the way we connect with each other. What does social health mean now in an “always on” hyper-connected world?

For Julia Hobsbawm, the first “Professor of Networking,” and author of Fully Connected: Surviving and Thriving in an Age of Overload, to be socially healthy means balancing face-to-face and electronic connections in a way that manages flows of knowledge, networks and time. Join her in conversation with journalist and novelist Zoe Heller, as she outlines the impediments we face in the “Age of Overload,” and shows us how to to improve our social health, well-being and productivity through a series of practices, principles, exercises and habits.

Brief Bios

Julia Hobsbawm is a leading expert on connectedness in modern life. A prominent entrepreneur, media commentator and international speaker for corporate audiences, she has emerged as a leading voice on the future of workplace productivity practices, particularly around Social Health, and how scientific network patterns underpin much of what we do on a daily basis. She became the world’s first Professor of Networking in 2011, and is the Hon Visiting Professor at Cass Business School in London and at the University of Suffolk. She was awarded an OBE in 2015.

Zoe Heller has published three novels, including the Booker-shortlisted Notes on a Scandal. Her articles and reviews appear in the New York Review of Books and the New Yorker magazine.


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