Midnight Lunch pg3

Edla Frankau Cusick

 

ALINE
Time and place, my darling, for heaven's sake. Time and place. Come to think of it, this is the place, isn't it? Or, it might become the place. But it's not the time. There isn't time.

I'm meeting Alice and Irene Lewisohn down at Grand Street Settlement at two. We're fixing on the budget for this year's follies. Can you believe we might spend as much as two hundred dollars? And don't you have a class to teach? Anyway, there isn't even a place to sit down here, let alone...

TOM
There's the floor. Nice big floor.

ALINE
Thomas. Who do you take me for? I'm not one of your unwashed farm girls.

TOM
That's for sure. You're nice and clean, cleaner than clean.

[He takes several deep sniffs of her neck.]

You smell like...spice...flowers...big, fresh towels...you smell like money. You smell expensive. Only thing you worry about is you don't want your dress tearing, so your pals won't know you're getting pawed.

ALINE
Charmingly put.

I'd have to sweep first, at least. There's no broom, so that's that. Even then, for heaven's sake—

TOM
There's standing up. Farm boys learn to do that. Real quiet like. Like this. Want to try? You're so little. I'd pick you right up. Like this. Wouldn't take a moment.

ALINE
Enough! Go teach. Come and meet me here tomorrow. Go on now. Jesus Christ. What is this?

TOM
Maybe we'll find out, hey, Lady? You'll be right here? What time?

ALINE
Let's make it a picnic. Meet me here at noon? I'll bring sandwiches and beer.

TOM
Promise?

ALINE
I promise. I'll be right here. We'll be right here. We'll be so right here.

[Wagging the key in his face and doing a few more merry steps.]

In our private, magic sky-nest. Wait 'til you see. This thing is ours.

[They laugh and hug, and then he exits. She looks around, rolls up her sleeves and begins ripping down old wallpaper.]

Edla Frankau Cusick a Manhattan native, is an artist and the mother of two grown children. Midnight Lunch is her first play. Many thanks for the wonderful guidance of instructor and playwright Han Ong.

Back to Issue 3