Fred Astaire proved to be a jazz master, using his innate sense of rhythm and swing to collaborate with songwriting legends from Gershwin (“Nice Work if You Can Get It”) to Berlin (“Puttin’ on the Ritz”) and others to introduce some of their biggest hits.

Sachal Vasandani, vocals
Ken Peplowski, clarinet & tenor sax
Michael Dease, trombone
Bucky Pizzarelli, guitar
Renee Rosnes, piano
Bill Charlap, piano
George Mraz, bass
Carl Allen, drums

 

Join us for more Jazz! This event can be purchased as part of a 2-concert, 4-concert or 6-concert package.

 

Jazz in July is partially endowed by a generous gift from Simona and Jerome A. Chazen.

Fred Astaire sings the Gershwin’s “They Can’t Take That Away From Me” from Shall We Dance, 1937

Fred Astaire sings Cole Porter’s “Night and Day” and dances with Ginger Rogers in The Gay Divorcee, 2

Fred sings a medley of songs from the NBC special, “An Evening with Fred Astaire,” beginning with “Lady Be Good,” Oct 17, 1958

Karen Ziemba and David Elder dance “It Only Happens When I Dance With You,” from Lyrics & Lyricists’ “Fred & Ginger in So Many Words: The Astaire–Rogers Songbook,” March 20–22, 2010, on 92Y OnDemand

Fred Astaire as the Mystery Guest on “What’s My Line,” June 8, 1958

Explore the Music

Fred Astaire, original name Frederick Austerlitz (born May 10, 1899, Omaha, Neb., U.S.—died June 22, 1987, Los Angeles, Calif.), American dancer of stage and motion pictures who is best known for a number of highly successful musical comedy films in which he starred with Ginger Rogers. He is regarded by many as the greatest popular-music dancer of all time.

Astaire was born into a wealthy family. He studied dancing from the age of four and in 1906 formed an act with his sister, Adele, that became a popular vaudeville attraction. The two appeared briefly in the Mary Pickford film Fanchon the Cricket (1915) and made their Broadway debut in Over the Top (1917). They achieved international fame with stage hits that included For Goodness Sake (1922), Funny Face (1927), and The Band Wagon (1931). When Adele retired after marrying Lord Charles Cavendish in 1932, Astaire made a screen test, receiving the verdict from executives: “Can’t act, can’t sing. Balding. Can dance a little.” He was nevertheless cast as a featured dancer in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production Dancing Lady (1933), which starred Joan Crawford, Clark Gable, and the Three Stooges.

Also in 1933 Astaire was paired with Ginger Rogers in the RKO Radio Pictures production Flying Down to Rio. They were a sensation, stealing the picture from stars Delores del Rio and Gene Raymond, and public demand compelled RKO to feature the pair in a classic series of starring vehicles throughout the 1930s, with The Gay Divorcee (1934), Top Hat (1935), and Swing Time (1936) often cited as the best of the lot. Although Astaire worked well with several leading ladies throughout his career, his partnership with Rogers had a special chemistry. Their respective elegance (Astaire) and earthiness (Rogers) rubbed off on one another, and it has often been said that he gave her class and she gave him sex appeal. Their dance routines, often in the midst of sumptuous Art Deco settings, were intricate tap or graceful ballroom numbers that served as sophisticated statements of romantic love. Only once—in Carefree (1938)—did Astaire and Rogers share an on-screen kiss, and then only in a dream sequence.

Astaire’s immensely popular dancing style appeared relaxed, light, effortless, and largely improvised. In reality, he was a hard-working perfectionist who tirelessly rehearsed routines for hours on end. Working in collaboration with legendary choreographer Hermes Pan for his films with Rogers, Astaire eschewed the then-popular Busby Berkeley approach to filmed musicals and its emphasis on special effects, surreal settings, and chorus girls in ever-changing kaleidoscope patterns. Instead, Astaire revolutionized the movie musical by simplifying it: solo dancers or couples were shot in full-figure, and dances were filmed with a minimum of edits and camera angles. He is regarded as a pioneer in the serious presentation of dance on film.

After the last RKO Astaire-Rogers film, in 1939, Astaire appeared with various partners such as Eleanor Powell, Rita Hayworth (whom Astaire cited as his favourite on-screen partner), and Lucille Bremer. He retired temporarily in 1946 but returned to the screen in 1948 and appeared in a series of Technicolor musicals for MGM that, next to his films with Rogers, constitute his most highly regarded body of work. Several of Astaire’s most-famous dance routines appear in these films, such as the slow-motion dance in Easter Parade (1948), the dance with empty shoes in The Barkleys of Broadway (1949, his only reunion with Ginger Rogers), the ceiling dance and the duet with a hat rack in Royal Wedding (1951), and the dance on air in The Belle of New York (1952). The best of Astaire’s films during this period was The Band Wagon (1953), often cited as one of the greatest of film musicals; it featured Astaire’s memorable duet with Cyd Charisse to the song “Dancing in the Dark.” Astaire’s run of classic MGM musicals ended with Silk Stockings (1957), after which his screen appearances were mostly in nondancing character roles. He continued to dance with new partner Barrie Chase for several Emmy Award-winning television specials throughout the 1950s and ’60s, and he danced again on-screen in Finian’s Rainbow (1968) and for a few steps with Gene Kelly in That’s Entertainment, Part II (1976).

In addition to Astaire’s immeasurable contributions to the art of dance, he was noted for his quintessentially American vocal style. Although possessing a rather thin-toned tenor voice, Astaire received much praise from jazz critics for his innate sense of swing and his conversational way with a song. Several compilations have been issued of Astaire songs from film sound tracks, but his best vocal recordings were those he undertook in the early 1950s with jazz combos led by pianist Oscar Peterson. They have been released under several titles on various LP and CD collections over the years.

Astaire’s most notable dramatic roles were in On the Beach (1959); The Pleasure of His Company (1962); The Towering Inferno (1974), for which he received an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor; and Ghost Story (1981), his final film. He was awarded an honorary Academy Award for his contributions to film in 1950, and he received a Life Achievement Award from the American Film Institute in 1981. Despite the many accolades for his unquestionable greatness, Astaire remained as modest and elegant as the characters he portrayed. As he said in his autobiography, Steps in Time (1959), “I have no desire to prove anything by it. I just dance.”

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  • I Won’t Dance: The Fred Astaire Songbook

    Date: Thu, Jul 31, 2014, 8 pm

    Location: Lexington Avenue at 92nd St

    Venue: Kaufmann Concert Hall

    Price: from $60.00

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